Optimized positioning through maximized tip visibility – Arrow AFM probes screencast passes 500 views mark

The screencast about NanoWorld Arrow Silicon AFM probes held byNanoWorld AG CEO Manfred Detterbeck has just passed the 500 views mark. Congratulations Manfred!

NanoWorld Arrow™ AFM probes are designed for easy AFM tip positioning and high resolution AFM imaging and are very popular with AFM users due to the highly symetric scans that are possible with these AFM probes because of their special tip shape. They fit to all well-known commercial SPMs (Scanning Probe Microscopes) and AFMs (Atomic Force Microscopes). The Arrow AFM probe consists of an AFM probe support chip with an AFM cantilever which has a tetrahedral AFM tip at its triangular free end.

The Arrow AFM probe is entirely made of monolithic, highly doped silicon.

The unique Arrow™ shape of the AFM cantilever with the AFM tip always placed at the very end of the AFM cantilever allows easy positioning of the AFM tip on the area of interest.
The Arrow AFM probes are available for non-contact mode, contact mode and force modulation mode imaging and are also available with a conductive platinum iridum coating. Furthermore the Arrow™ AFM probe series also includes a range of tipless AFM cantilevers and AFM cantilever arrays as well as dedicated ultra-high frequency Arrow AFM probes for high speed AFM.

To find out more about the different variations please have a look at:

https://www.nanoworld.com/arrow-afm-tips

You can also find various application examples for the Arrow AFM probes in the NanoWorld blog. For a selection of these articles just click on the “Arrow AFM probes” tag on the bottom of this blog entry.

 

 

Intravascular adhesion and recruitment of neutrophils in response to CXCL1 depends on their TRPC6 channels

Representing a central element of the innate immune system, neutrophils are recruited from the blood stream to a site of inflammation. The recruitment process follows a well-defined sequence of events including adhesion to the blood vessel walls, migration, and chemotaxis to reach the inflammatory focus. A common feature of the underlying signalling pathways is the utilization of Ca2+ ions as intracellular second messengers. However, the required Ca2+ influx channels are not yet fully characterized.*

In the article “Intravascular adhesion and recruitment of neutrophils in response to CXCL1 depends on their TRPC6 channels” Otto Lindemann, Jan Rossaint, Karolina Najder, Sandra Schimmelpfennig, Verena Hofschröer, Mike Wälte, Benedikt Fels, Hans Oberleithner, Alexander Zarbock and Albrecht Schwab report a novel role for TRPC6, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel family, in the CXCL1-dependent recruitment of murine neutrophil granulocytes.*

The authors describe how they tested whether TRPC6 channels are central elements of the signalling cascade underlying CXCR2-mediated neutrophil recruitment. They combined intravital microscopy, single-cell force spectroscopy with atomic force microscopy, Ca2+ imaging, and microfluidic flow chamber assays to investigate the role of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils for their recruitment in renal ischemia-reperfusion and cremaster models as well as in in vitro assays.*

The study reveals that TRPC6 channels in neutrophils are crucial signalling modules in their recruitment from the blood stream in response to CXCL1.*

The single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with NanoWorld Arrow-TL1 tipless cantilevers which were incubated prior to experiments for 30 min in Cell-Tak to make the AFM cantilever sticky for neutrophils.*

NanoWorld Arrow-TL1 Tipless AFM cantilever, single cantilever beam on a silicon support chip
NanoWorld Arrow-TL1
Tipless cantilever,
single cantilever beam on a silicon support chip

*Otto Lindemann, Jan Rossaint, Karolina Najder, Sandra Schimmelpfennig, Verena Hofschröer, Mike Wälte, Benedikt Fels, Hans Oberleithner, Alexander Zarbock and Albrecht Schwab
Intravascular adhesion and recruitment of neutrophils in response to CXCL1 depends on their TRPC6 channels
Journal of Molecular Medicine volume 98, pages349–360(2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00109-020-01872-4

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00109-020-01872-4

Open Access The article “ Intravascular adhesion and recruitment of neutrophils in response to CXCL1 depends on their TRPC6 channels “ by Otto Lindemann, Jan Rossaint, Karolina Najder, Sandra Schimmelpfennig, Verena Hofschröer, Mike Wälte, Benedikt Fels, Hans Oberleithner, Alexander Zarbock and Albrecht Schwab is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Simultaneous Quantification of the Interplay Between Molecular Turnover and Cell Mechanics by AFM–FRAP

Quantifying the adaptive mechanical behavior of living cells is essential for the understanding of their inner working and function.*

In their article “Simultaneous Quantification of the Interplay Between Molecular Turnover and Cell Mechanics by AFM–FRAP” Mark Skamrahl, Huw Colin‐York, Liliana Barbieri and Marco Fritzsche use a combination of atomic force microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching is introduced which offers simultaneous quantification and direct correlation of molecule kinetics and mechanics in living cells.*

Simultaneous quantification of the relationship between molecule kinetics and cell mechanics may thus open up unprecedented insights into adaptive mechanobiological mechanisms of cells.*

For the AFM nanoindentation tests described in their publication the authors used NanoWorld Arrow-TL2 tipless cantilevers that were functionalized with a polystyrene bead with 5 µm radius.*

 Figure 1 a from “Simultaneous Quantification of the Interplay Between Molecular Turnover and Cell Mechanics by AFM–FRAP” by M. Skamrahl et al.: 
 Establishment and calibration of the optomechanical AFM–FRAP platform. a) Schematic of the AFM–FRAP setup illustrating the experimental power of simultaneous quantification of molecule kinetics and cell mechanics
Figure 1 a from “Simultaneous Quantification of the Interplay Between Molecular Turnover and Cell Mechanics by AFM–FRAP” by M. Skamrahl et al.:
Establishment and calibration of the optomechanical AFM–FRAP platform. a) Schematic of the AFM–FRAP setup illustrating the experimental power of simultaneous quantification of molecule kinetics and cell mechanics

*Mark Skamrahl, Huw Colin‐York, Liliana Barbieri, Marco Fritzsche
Simultaneous Quantification of the Interplay Between Molecular Turnover and Cell Mechanics by AFM–FRAP
Small 2019, 1902202
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/smll.201902202

Please follow this external link to the full article https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/smll.201902202

Open Access: The article « Simultaneous Quantification of the Interplay Between Molecular Turnover and Cell Mechanics by AFM–FRAP » by Mark Skamrahl, Huw Colin‐York, Liliana Barbieri and Marco Fritzsche is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other thirdparty material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.