Piezoelectricity of green carp scales

Today is Children’s Day in Japan and many mulit-colored carp-shaped koinobori streamers are fluttering in the wind.

So it is the perfect day to repost and share the publication “Piezoelectricity of green carp scales” by Y. Jiang et al. with you.

Piezoelectricity takes part in multiple important functions and processes in biomaterials often vital to the survival of organisms. In their publication , “Piezoelectricity of green carp scales” Y. Jiang et al. investigate the piezoelectric properties of fish scales of green carp by directly examining their morphology at nanometer levels. From the clear distinctions between the composition of the inner and outer surfaces of the scales that could be found, the authors identified the piezoelectricity to originate from the presence of hydroxyapatite which only exists on the surface of the fish scales.*

koinobori - carp streamers on children's day in Matsumoto Japan
koinobori – carp streamers on children’s day in Matsumoto Japan

These findings reveal a different mechanism of how green carp are sensitive to their surroundings and should be helpful to studies related to the electromechanical properties of marine life and the development of bio-inspired materials. As easily accessible natural polymers, fish scales can be employed as highly sensitive piezoelectric materials in high sensitive and high speed devices as well as be exploited for invasive diagnostics and other biomedical implications.*

For the harmonic responses of both 1st order and 2nd order described in this publication, NanoWorld Arrow-CONTPt AFM probes were used.

FIG. 6 from “Piezoelectricity of green carp scales “ by H. Y. Jiang et al.: First and second harmonic responses of (a) domain I and (b) domain IV. The straight line fitting for the amplitude of first harmonic response of (c) domain I and (d) domain IV by applying a series of bias. NanoWorld Arrow-CONTPt AFM probes were used.
FIG. 6 from “Piezoelectricity of green carp scales “ by H. Y. Jiang et al.: First and second harmonic responses of (a) domain I and (b) domain IV. The straight line fitting for the amplitude of first harmonic response of (c) domain I and (d) domain IV by applying a series of bias.

*Y. Jiang, F. Yen, C. W. Huang, R. B. Mei, and L. Chen
Piezoelectricity of green carp scales
AIP Advances 7, 045215 (2017)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4979503

Please follow this external link to access the full article: https://aip.scitation.org/doi/full/10.1063/1.4979503

Open Access The article “Piezoelectricity of green carp scales” by Y. Jiang, F. Yen, C. W. Huang, R. B. Mei and L. Chen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Optimized positioning through maximized tip visibility – Arrow AFM probes screencast passes 500 views mark

The screencast about NanoWorld Arrow Silicon AFM probes held byNanoWorld AG CEO Manfred Detterbeck has just passed the 500 views mark. Congratulations Manfred!

NanoWorld Arrow™ AFM probes are designed for easy AFM tip positioning and high resolution AFM imaging and are very popular with AFM users due to the highly symetric scans that are possible with these AFM probes because of their special tip shape. They fit to all well-known commercial SPMs (Scanning Probe Microscopes) and AFMs (Atomic Force Microscopes). The Arrow AFM probe consists of an AFM probe support chip with an AFM cantilever which has a tetrahedral AFM tip at its triangular free end.

The Arrow AFM probe is entirely made of monolithic, highly doped silicon.

The unique Arrow™ shape of the AFM cantilever with the AFM tip always placed at the very end of the AFM cantilever allows easy positioning of the AFM tip on the area of interest.
The Arrow AFM probes are available for non-contact mode, contact mode and force modulation mode imaging and are also available with a conductive platinum iridum coating. Furthermore the Arrow™ AFM probe series also includes a range of tipless AFM cantilevers and AFM cantilever arrays as well as dedicated ultra-high frequency Arrow AFM probes for high speed AFM.

To find out more about the different variations please have a look at:

https://www.nanoworld.com/arrow-afm-tips

You can also find various application examples for the Arrow AFM probes in the NanoWorld blog. For a selection of these articles just click on the “Arrow AFM probes” tag on the bottom of this blog entry.

 

 

Flexible Robust and High‐Density FeRAM from Array of Organic Ferroelectric Nano‐Lamellae by Self‐Assembly

Ferroelectric memories are endowed with high data storage density by nanostructure designing, while the robustness is also impaired. For organic ferroelectrics favored by flexible memories, low Curie transition temperature limits their thermal stability.*

In their article “Flexible Robust and High‐Density FeRAM from Array of Organic Ferroelectric Nano‐Lamellae by Self‐Assembly “ Mengfan Guo, Jianyong Jiang, Jianfeng Qian, Chen Liu, Jing Ma, Ce‐Wen Nan and Yang Shen demonstrate that a ferroelectric random access memory ( FeRAM ) with high thermal stability and data storage density of ≈60 GB inch−2 could be achieved from an array of edge‐on nano‐lamellae by low‐temperature self‐assembly of P(VDF‐TrFE).*

The self‐assembled P(VDF‐TrFE) described in the article exhibits high storage density of 60 GB inch−2 as a prototype of flexible FeRAM. The authors experimentally determine the self‐assembled FeRAM stored data more robustly, with temperature endurance enhanced over 10 °C and reliable thermal cycling ability. The article shows a novel path to address the thermal stability issues in organic FeRAMs and presents a detailed analysis about the origin of enhanced performance in aligned P(VDF‐TrFE). *

NanoWorld Arrow-CONTPt AFM probes with a conducting Pt/Ir coating were used for the Piezoresponse Force Microscopy ( PFM ) measurements described in this article.

Figure 4 from “Flexible Robust and High‐Density FeRAM from Array of Organic Ferroelectric Nano‐Lamellae by Self‐Assembly” by Mengfan Guo et al.:
Enhanced thermal stability in SA P(VDF‐TrFE). a–c) PFM images of data stored in self‐assembled film at a) 25 °C and b) 90 °C, as well as c) numeric figure of residual area of reversal domains as a function of elevated temperature in a SA film (blue) and a NSA film (red). d) Numeric figure of residual area of reversal domains as a function of thermal cycles in a SA film (blue) and a NSA film (red). Scale bars: 200 nm.

*Mengfan Guo, Jianyong Jiang, Jianfeng Qian, Chen Liu, Jing Ma, Ce‐Wen Nan, Yang Shen
Flexible Robust and High‐Density FeRAM from Array of Organic Ferroelectric Nano‐Lamellae by Self‐Assembly
Advanced Science, Volume6, Issue6, March 20, 2019, 1801931
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/advs.201801931

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/advs.201801931

Open Access: The article « Flexible Robust and High‐Density FeRAM from Array of Organic Ferroelectric Nano‐Lamellae by Self‐Assembly » by Mengfan Guo, Jianyong Jiang, Jianfeng Qian, Chen Liu, Jing Ma, Ce‐Wen Nan and Yang Shen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.