Real-Time Observation of Fibrous Zeolites Reactivity in Contact with Simulated Lung Fluids (SLFs) Obtained by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)

Inhalation of fibrous erionite particles has been linked to malignant mesothelioma. Accordingly, erionite is considered the most carcinogenic mineral. The reactivity and the nature of erionite biotoxicity has been the subject of intensive research. Despite very close chemical and structural relationships between erionite and offretite, the reactivity of offretite in lung fluids remains unknown.*
In their paper “Real-Time Observation of Fibrous Zeolites Reactivity in Contact with Simulated Lung Fluids (SLFs) Obtained by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)”, Matteo Giordani, Georgia Cametti, Fulvio Di Lorenzo and Sergey V. Churakov investigate the interaction of erionite and offretite surfaces with simulated lung fluids by means of in situ atomic force microscope (AFM).*

The outcomes presented in the paper mentioned above represent an important step in understanding the complex processes occurring at the surfaces of mineral fibres that could be involved in the toxicological pathway.*

The topography scans were performed in tapping mode with a NanoWorld Arrow-UHFAuD AFM probes under different experimental conditions.
To better discriminate the role of the tip from the actual fluid-surface interaction, additional measurements were performed in air and in water in contact mode using an Al-coated NanoWorld Arrow-CONTR AFM cantilever.

Figure 2 from M. Giordani et al. “Real-Time Observation of Fibrous Zeolites Reactivity in Contact with Simulated Lung Fluids (SLFs) Obtained by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)”: Atomic force microscope (AFM) images of offretite FF surface, in MilliQ water at 25 °C, at different magnifications: (a) height retrace image of particles of different sizes on surface and related sections (d); (b) amplitude retrace image of particularly clean surface terraces and related section (c).

*Matteo Giordani, Georgia Cametti, Fulvio Di Lorenzo and Sergey V. Churakov
Real-Time Observation of Fibrous Zeolites Reactivity in Contact with Simulated Lung Fluids (SLFs) Obtained by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)
Minerals 2019, 9(2), 83
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/min9020083

Please follow this external link for the full article: https://www.mdpi.com/403600

Open Access: The paper « Real-Time Observation of Fibrous Zeolites Reactivity in Contact with Simulated Lung Fluids (SLFs) Obtained by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) » by Matteo Giordani, Georgia Cametti, Fulvio Di Lorenzo and Sergey V. Churakov is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Ultra-high resolution imaging of thin films and single strands of polythiophene using atomic force microscopy

Real-space images of polymers with sub-molecular resolution could provide valuable insights into the relationship between morphology and functionality of polymer optoelectronic devices, but their acquisition is problematic due to perceived limitations in atomic force microscopy (AFM).*

In the article “Ultra-high resolution imaging of thin films and single strands of polythiophene using atomic force microscopy” Vladimir V. Korolkov, Alex Summerfield, Alanna Murphy, David B. Amabilino, Kenji Watanabe, Takashi Taniguchi and Peter H. Beton show that individual thiophene units and the lattice of semicrystalline spin-coated films of polythiophenes (PTs) may be resolved using AFM under ambient conditions through the low-amplitude (≤ 1 nm) excitation of higher eigenmodes of a cantilever.*

They authors demonstrate that the use of higher eigenmodes in tapping-mode ambient AFM can be successfully employed to characterize both individual polymer strands down to a single-atom level and also the ordering of a semi-crystalline polymer with technological relevance. The combination of AFM and solution deposition provides a simple and high-resolution approach to characterizing the structure of polymers.*

The use of NanoWorld Arrow-UHF high frequency AFM probes at their first eigenmode of ~1.4 MHz is mentioned.*


Figure 1a from “Ultra-high resolution imaging of thin films and single strands of polythiophene using atomic force microscopy” by V. Korolkov et al.: High-resolution AFM images of P3DT adsorbed on the surface of hBN. a An overview height scan of P3DT assembled on hBN, scan rate 6.51 Hz, 1024 × 1024 px; inset shows lattice frequency shift image of hBN acquired in FM-AFM tapping mode, scan rate 39 Hz, 512 × 512 px; both images were acquired with the same Arrow UHF probe oscillating at fundamental frequency of 1.42 MHz.

*Vladimir V. Korolkov, Alex Summerfield, Alanna Murphy, David B. Amabilino, Kenji Watanabe, Takashi Taniguchi and Peter H. Beton
Ultra-high resolution imaging of thin films and single strands of polythiophene using atomic force microscopy
Nature Communications, volume 10, Article number: 1537 (2019)
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-09571-6

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/bLSdL

Open Access: The article « Ultra-high resolution imaging of thin films and single strands of polythiophene using atomic force microscopy » by Vladimir V. Korolkov, Alex Summerfield, Alanna Murphy, David B. Amabilino, Kenji Watanabe, Takashi Taniguchi and Peter H. Beton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

In Situ Molecular-Level Observation of Methanol Catalysis at the Water–Graphite Interface

“Methanol occupies a central role in chemical synthesis and is considered an ideal candidate for cleaner fuel storage and transportation. It can be catalyzed from water and volatile organic compounds, such as carbon dioxide, thereby offering an attractive solution for reducing carbon emissions.”*

In “In Situ Molecular-Level Observation of Methanol Catalysis at the Water–Graphite Interface” the authors show that graphite immersed in ultrapure water is able to spontaneously catalyze methanol from volatile organic compounds in ambient conditions. Using single-molecule resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid, they directly observe the formation and evolution of methanol–water nanostructures at the surface of graphite.*
The findings described in this article could have a significant impact on the development of organic catalysts and on the function of nanoscale carbon devices

NanoWorld ARROW-UHFAuD AFM probes were used for the Atomic Force Microscopy imaging in liquid.

Figure 1 from “In Situ Molecular-Level Observation of Methanol Catalysis at the Water–Graphite Interface” by W. Foster et al.: High-resolution amplitude modulation AFM imaging of HOPG immersed in initially ultrapure water. (a) A solid-like patch formed by the self-assembly of molecules (dashed white outline) nucleates from an atomic step at the HOPG surface (dashed black line). The molecular self-assembly is observed here in situ as it progressively grows across the HOPG surface over a period of 9 min, with the patch edges moving away from the step. Rowlike structures with a periodicity of 4.30 ± 0.28 nm as visible within the patch. (b) Sub-nanometer imaging of other structures reveals detailed features (0.79 ± 0.08 nm periodicity, red arrows) perpendicular to the main rows (periodicity 2.45 ± 0.08 nm, white arrow). The exact molecular arrangement is not known, but strongly reminiscent of the alternated water–methanol nanoribbons recently reported by our group.(22) The white scale bars are 100 nm in (a) and 1 nm in (b). The purple color scale bar represents a topographic variation of 20 Å in (a) and 1 Å nm in (b). The blue scale bar represents a phase variation of 20° in (a) and 10° in (b). In (a) the time lapse between the first and second frames is 1 min and then 4 min elapses between the subsequent frames. NanoWorld Arrow-UHFAuD AFM probes were used.
Figure 1 from “In Situ Molecular-Level Observation of Methanol Catalysis at the Water–Graphite Interface” by W. Foster et al.: High-resolution amplitude modulation AFM imaging of HOPG immersed in initially ultrapure water. (a) A solid-like patch formed by the self-assembly of molecules (dashed white outline) nucleates from an atomic step at the HOPG surface (dashed black line). The molecular self-assembly is observed here in situ as it progressively grows across the HOPG surface over a period of 9 min, with the patch edges moving away from the step. Rowlike structures with a periodicity of 4.30 ± 0.28 nm as visible within the patch. (b) Sub-nanometer imaging of other structures reveals detailed features (0.79 ± 0.08 nm periodicity, red arrows) perpendicular to the main rows (periodicity 2.45 ± 0.08 nm, white arrow). The exact molecular arrangement is not known, but strongly reminiscent of the alternated water–methanol nanoribbons recently reported by our group.(22) The white scale bars are 100 nm in (a) and 1 nm in (b). The purple color scale bar represents a topographic variation of 20 Å in (a) and 1 Å nm in (b). The blue scale bar represents a phase variation of 20° in (a) and 10° in (b). In (a) the time lapse between the first and second frames is 1 min and then 4 min elapses between the subsequent frames

*William Foster, Juan A. Aguilar, Halim Kusumaatmaja, Kislon Voϊtchovsky
In Situ Molecular-Level Observation of Methanol Catalysis at the Water–Graphite Interface
ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2018, 10 (40), pp 34265–34271
DOI: 10.1021/acsami.8b12113

Please follow this external link for the full article: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acsami.8b12113

Open Access The article “In Situ Molecular-Level Observation of Methanol Catalysis at the Water–Graphite Interface” by William Foster, Juan A. Aguilar, Halim Kusumaatmaja and Kislon Voϊtchovsky is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.