Photoresponsive Photoacid-Macroion Nano-Assemblies

In mother nature, the concept of self-assembly is vital for life, as it generates much of the functionality of living cells. It also bears great synthetic potential for the formation of versatile, switchable, and functional nanostructures.*

Noncovalent interactions can be triggered by external influences, such as the change of pH, light irradiation, thermal activation, introduction of a magnetic field, moisture, or redox response. Of high interest are light-responsive systems, for example in the fields of sensors or therapy, and, thus, it is desirable to explore novel concepts toward light-triggerable self-assembly.*

In the article “Photoresponsive Photoacid-Macroion Nano-Assemblies” Alexander Zika, Sarah Bernhardt and Franziska Gröhn present light-responsive nano-assemblies with light-switchable size based on photoacids.*

Anionic disulfonated napthol derivates and cationic dendrimer macroions are used as building blocks for electrostatic self-assembly. Nanoparticles are already formed under the exclusion of light as a result of electrostatic interactions. Upon photoexcitation, an excited-state dissociation of the photoacidic hydroxyl group takes place, which leads to a more highly charged linker molecule and, subsequently, to a change in size and structure of the nano-assemblies. The effects of the charge ratio and the concentration on the stability have been examined with absorption spectroscopy and -potential measurements.*

The influence of the chemical structure of three isomeric photoacids on the size and shape of the nanoscale aggregates has been studied by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy, revealing a direct correlation of the strength of the photoacid with the changes of the assemblies upon irradiation.*

NanoWorld Ultra-Short AFM Cantilevers of the USC-F0.3-k0.3 type ( typical force constant 0.3 N/m ) were operated in tapping mode for the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images presented in the article.*

Figure 1 a from “Photoresponsive Photoacid-Macroion Nano-Assemblies” by Alexander Zika  et al:
Assembly formation and photoresponse of the dendrimer–photoacid system at a charge ratio of r = 0.25: (a) AFM height images before (right) and after (left) irradiation.  Figure 1 a from “Photoresponsive Photoacid-Macroion Nano-Assemblies” by Alexander Zika  et al:
Assembly formation and photoresponse of the dendrimer–photoacid system at a charge ratio of r = 0.25: (a) AFM height images before (right) and after (left) irradiation.
Figure 1 a from “Photoresponsive Photoacid-Macroion Nano-Assemblies” by Alexander Zika  et al:
Assembly formation and photoresponse of the dendrimer–photoacid system at a charge ratio of r = 0.25: (a) AFM height images before (right) and after (left) irradiation. Please refer to the full article for the full figure https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4360/12/8/1746

*Alexander Zika, Sarah Bernhardt and Franziska Gröhn
Photoresponsive Photoacid-Macroion Nano-Assemblies
Polymers 2020, 12, 1746
DOI: 10.3390/polym12081746

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4360/12/8/1746

Open Access : The article “Photoresponsive Photoacid-Macroion Nano-Assemblies” by Alexander Zika, Sarah Bernhardt and Franziska Gröhn is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Human ESCRT-III polymers assemble on positively curved membranes and induce helical membrane tube formation

The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport-III (ESCRT-III) is part of a conserved membrane remodeling machine. ESCRT-III employs polymer formation to catalyze inside-out membrane fission processes in a large variety of cellular processes, including budding of endosomal vesicles and enveloped viruses, cytokinesis, nuclear envelope reformation, plasma membrane repair, exosome formation, neuron pruning, dendritic spine maintenance, and preperoxisomal vesicle biogenesis.*

How membrane shape influences ESCRT-III polymerization and how ESCRT-III shapes membranes is yet unclear.*

In the article “Human ESCRT-III polymers assemble on positively curved membranes and induce helical membrane tube formation” Aurélie Bertin, Nicola de Franceschi, Eugenio de la Mora, Sourav Maity, Maryam Alqabandi, Nolwen Miguet, Aurélie di Cicco, Wouter H. Roos, Stéphanie Mangenot, Winfried Weissenhorn and Patricia Bassereau describe how human core ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP4B, CHMP2A, CHMP2B and CHMP3 are used to address this issue in vitro by combining membrane nanotube pulling experiments, cryo-electron tomography and Atomic Force Microscopy.*

The authors show that CHMP4B filaments preferentially bind to flat membranes or to tubes with positive mean curvature.*

The results presented in the article cited above underline the versatile membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III that may be a general feature required for cellular membrane remodeling processes.*

The authors provide novel insight on how mechanics and geometry of the membrane and of ESCRT-III assemblies can generate forces to shape a membrane neck.*

NanoWorld Ultra-Short AFM Cantilevers USC-F1.2-k0.15 were used for the High-speed Atomic Force Microscopy ( HS-AFM ) experiments presented in this article.*

Figure 1 from «Human ESCRT-III polymers assemble on positively curved membranes and induce helical membrane tube formation” by Aurélie Bertin et al.:
CHMP4-ΔC flattens LUVs and binds preferentially to flat membranes or to membranes with a positive mean curvature.
1a CHMP4B-ΔC spirals observed by HS-AFM on a lipid bilayer. Scale bar: 50 nm.
Please refer to the full article for the complete figure: https://rdcu.be/b5rOe
Figure 1 from «Human ESCRT-III polymers assemble on positively curved membranes and induce helical membrane tube formation” by Aurélie Bertin et al.:
CHMP4-ΔC flattens LUVs and binds preferentially to flat membranes or to membranes with a positive mean curvature.
1a CHMP4B-ΔC spirals observed by HS-AFM on a lipid bilayer. Scale bar: 50 nm.
Please refer to the full article for the complete figure: https://rdcu.be/b5rOe

*Aurélie Bertin, Nicola de Franceschi, Eugenio de la Mora, Sourav Maity, Maryam Alqabandi, Nolwen Miguet, Aurélie di Cicco, Wouter H. Roos, Stéphanie Mangenot, Winfried Weissenhorn and Patricia Bassereau
Human ESCRT-III polymers assemble on positively curved membranes and induce helical membrane tube formation
Nature Communications volume 11, Article number: 2663 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16368-5

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/b5rOe

Open Access The article “ Human ESCRT-III polymers assemble on positively curved membranes and induce helical membrane tube formation “ by Aurélie Bertin, Nicola de Franceschi, Eugenio de la Mora, Sourav Maity, Maryam Alqabandi, Nolwen Miguet, Aurélie di Cicco, Wouter H. Roos, Stéphanie Mangenot, Winfried Weissenhorn and Patricia Bassereau is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.