A Short Peptide Hydrogel with High Stiffness Induced by 310‐Helices to β‐Sheet Transition in Water

In the article “A Short Peptide Hydrogel with High Stiffness Induced by 310‐Helices to β‐Sheet Transition in Water” by Shu Hui Hiew, Harini Mohanram, Lulu Ning, Jingjing Guo, Antoni Sánchez‐Ferrer, Xiangyan Shi, Konstantin Pervushin, Yuguang Mu, Raffaele Mezzenga and Ali Miserez, a short biomimetic peptide composed of eight amino acid residues derived from squid sucker ring teeth proteins is demonstrated to form hydrogel in water without any cross‐linking agent or chemical modification and exhibits a stiffness on par with the stiffest peptide hydrogels.
Their study broadens the range of secondary structures available to create supramolecular hydrogels, and introduces 310‐helices as transient building blocks for gelation via a 310‐to‐β‐sheet conformational transition.*

The AFM images presented in this study were obtained in soft tapping mode using NanoWorld Pointprobe® NCSTR AFM probes.

Figure 1 from «A Short Peptide Hydrogel with High Stiffness Induced by
310‐ Helices to β‐Sheet Transition in Water” by Shu Hui Hiew et al.
Structural features and physico‐chemical properties of GV8 peptide hydrogel observed with time‐series spectroscopy measurements during gelation
b) AFM amplitude profile of dried GV8 hydrogel with fibers of ≈6–10 nm height.

*Shu Hui Hiew, Harini Mohanram, Lulu Ning, Jingjing Guo, Antoni Sánchez‐Ferrer, Xiangyan Shi, Konstantin Pervushin, Yuguang Mu, Raffaele Mezzenga, Ali Miserez
A Short Peptide Hydrogel with High Stiffness Induced by 310‐Helices to β‐Sheet Transition in Water
Advanced Science 2019, 1901173
Doi: https://doi.org/10.1002/advs.201901173

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/advs.201901173

Open Access: The article « A Short Peptide Hydrogel with High Stiffness Induced by 310‐Helices to β‐Sheet Transition in Water » ” by Shu Hui Hiew, Harini Mohanram, Lulu Ning, Jingjing Guo, Antoni Sánchez‐Ferrer, Xiangyan Shi, Konstantin Pervushin, Yuguang Mu, Raffaele Mezzenga and Ali Miserez is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other thirdparty material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

New Insights in the Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition of ZnO-Fluoropolymer Nanocomposites

Surface modification treatments able to confer antistain/antibacterial properties to natural or synthetic materials are receiving increasing attention among scientists. Ion beam co-sputtering (IBS) of zinc oxide (ZnO) and poly-tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) targets allows for the preparation of novel multifunctional coatings composed of antimicrobial ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) finely dispersed in an antistain PTFE polymeric matrix.*

In the article “New Insights in the Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition of ZnO-Fluoropolymer Nanocomposites” Maria Chiara Sportelli, Marco Valentini, Rosaria Anna Picca, Antonella Milella, Angelo Nacci, Antonio Valentini and Nicola Cioffi describe the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the characterization of the IBS deposited coatings in order to obtain information on the materials’ surface composition, with deep insight into the nanocoatings’ morphology as a function of the ZnONP loadings.*

The AFM micrographs shown in this article were acquired on 150-nm-thick films in dynamic (“tapping”) mode, in air, using NanoWorld Pointprobe® NCL AFM probes.

Figure 2 from “New Insights in the Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition of ZnO-Fluoropolymer Nanocomposites” by Maria Chiara Sportelli et al.: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) micrographs of ZnO-CFx nanocomposites having an inorganic phase volume fraction of φ = 0.05 (a–a’), φ = 0.10 (b–b’), and φ = 0.15 (c–c’). NanoWorld Pointprobe® NCL AFM probes were used.
Figure 2 from “New Insights in the Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition of ZnO-Fluoropolymer Nanocomposites” by Maria Chiara Sportelli et al.: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) micrographs of ZnO-CFx nanocomposites having an inorganic phase volume fraction of φ = 0.05 (a–a’), φ = 0.10 (b–b’), and φ = 0.15 (c–c’).

*Maria Chiara Sportelli, Marco Valentini, Rosaria Anna Picca, Antonella Milella, Angelo Nacci, Antonio Valentini and Nicola Cioffi
New Insights in the Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition of ZnO-Fluoropolymer Nanocomposites
Applied Sciences 2018, 8(1), 77
DOI: 10.3390/app8010077

Please follow this external link for the full article: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3417/8/1/77/htm

Open Access: The article « New Insights in the Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition of ZnO-Fluoropolymer Nanocomposites » by Maria Chiara Sportelli et al. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Self-assembled PCBM bilayers on graphene and HOPG examined by AFM and STM

In the article «Self-assembled PCBM bilayers on graphene and HOPG examined by AFM and STM” Yanlong Li, Chuanhui Chen, John Burton, Kyungwha Park, James R Heflin and Chenggang Tao demonstrate that PCBM molecules self-assemble into bilayer structures on graphene and HOPG substrates. They used Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), and analyzed the observed morphology by comparison to molecular models.*

The AFM measurements were carried out in a dark environment. NanoWorld™ Pointprobe® NCST AFM probes were used in soft tapping mode and simultaneous height and phase images were acquired and reproduced across multiple samples.*

The results of this study shed light on improvement of the energy efficiency in solar cells containing graphene and organic molecules, by increasing the donor–acceptor interface area and could provide valuable insight into fabrication of new hybrid, ordered structures for applications to organic solar cells.*

Figure 5. from “Self-assembled PCBM bilayers on graphene and HOPG examined by AFM and STM” by Yanlong Li et al.: AFM images of PCBM bilayer and size distributions of holes at different conditions. (a) AFM image of a PCBM bilayer before annealing. (b) AFM image of a PCBM bilayer after annealing at 140 °C. (c) AFM image of a PCBM bilayer after annealing at 160 °C. (d) Area distribution histogram of holes (without PCBM area) obtained from measurements of the area of holes in AFM images of before (green) and after annealing at 140 °C (dark red) and 160 °C (dark blue). Monolithic silicon cantilevers (NCST, NANO WORLD) with a spring constant of 7.4 N m−1, first longitudinal resonance frequencies between 120 and 205 kHz, and nominal tip radius of 8 nm were employed in soft tapping mode. Simultaneous height and phase images were acquired and reproduced across multiple samples.
Figure 5. from “Self-assembled PCBM bilayers on graphene and HOPG examined by AFM and STM” by Yanlong Li et al.: AFM images of PCBM bilayer and size distributions of holes at different conditions. (a) AFM image of a PCBM bilayer before annealing. (b) AFM image of a PCBM bilayer after annealing at 140 °C. (c) AFM image of a PCBM bilayer after annealing at 160 °C. (d) Area distribution histogram of holes (without PCBM area) obtained from measurements of the area of holes in AFM images of before (green) and after annealing at 140 °C (dark red) and 160 °C (dark blue).

*Yanlong Li, Chuanhui Chen, John Burton, Kyungwha Park, James R Heflin, Chenggang Tao
Self-assembled PCBM bilayers on graphene and HOPG examined by AFM and STM
Nanotechnology, Volume 29, Number 18 (2018)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6528/aab00a

Open Access The article “Self-assembled PCBM bilayers on graphene and HOPG examined by AFM and STM” by Yanlong Li et al. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/